Understanding Each IRS Tax Bracket

By Harris Walker
Updated January 2, 2017
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Understanding Each IRS Tax BracketYour IRS tax bracket will determine whether you have to complete a tax return, which one, what the deduction amount is, whether you get tax credits, and more. Essentially, there are five different statuses that you need to know when you want to learn about each IRS tax bracket:

1. Single

2. Married filing separately

3. Married filing jointly

4. Head of household

5. Qualifying widow(er) with dependent child

It is important that you indicate which of these five statuses you belong to when you file your tax return. If you qualify for multiple statuses, you can use the one for which you have to pay the lowest tax. Below are more details for those who want to learn about each IRS tax bracket.

What Is Each IRS Tax Bracket for 2017?

Every year, the IRS makes small changes to the tax brackets. These changes are not yet applicable to you now, as you should be filing for 2016, but it is nevertheless important to be aware of which IRS tax bracket you will be in next time you file, so that you are prepared. The IRS has made the same provisions for those married and filing jointly, and the qualifying widow(er). As such, the 2017 tax brackets are:

1. The 10% tax rate is for single filers earning up to $9,325; for married and filing jointly or qualifying widow(er)s earning up to $18,650; for married and filing separately earning up to $9,325; and for head of household earning up to $13,350.

2. The 15% tax rate is for single filers earning up to $37,950; for married and filing jointly or qualifying widow(er)s earning up to $75,900; for married and filing separately earning up to $37,950; and for head of household earning up to $50,800.

3. The 25% tax rate is for single filers earning up to $$91,900; for married and filing jointly or qualifying widow(er)s earning up to $153,100; for married and filing separately earning up to $76,550; and for head of household earning up to $131,200

4. The 28% tax rate is for single filers earning up to $191,650; for married and filing jointly or qualifying widow(er)s earning up to $233,350; for married and filing separately earning up to $116,675; and for head of household earning up to $212,00.

5. The 33% tax rate is for single filers earning up to $416,700; for married and filing jointly or qualifying widow(er)s earning up to $416,700; for married and filing separately earning up to $208,350; and for head of household earning up to $416,700.

6. The 35% tax rate is for single filers earning up to $418,400; for married and filing jointly or qualifying widow(er)s earning up to $470,700; for married and filing separately earning up to $235,350; and for head of household earning up to $444,550.

7. The 39.6% tax rate is for single filers earning over $418,401; for married and filing jointly or qualifying widow(er)s earning over $470,701; for married and filing separately earning over $235,352; and for head of household earning over $444,551.





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